Trailer

Advertisements

Synopsis

A woman seeks to make the outdoors more accessible for fat people – just as they are and without shame. Armed with her slogan “Trails Not Scales”, she soon finds herself hosting events all over North America.

When you picture an avid hiker, images from REI and MEC commercials come to mind: this person is often able-bodied, white, thin, and decked out in the latest outdoor gear and sporting equipment.

But what about fat people?

Hiking is an activity perceived to be out of the reaches of fat folks and other marginalized groups. This belief remains despite the social emphasis on weight-loss and fitness that often targets those who live outside the norm, especially those who inhabit bigger bodies.

Fat Hiking Club challenges this assumption.

This short documentary film captures the story of Summer Michaud-Skog, the founder of Fat Girls Hiking, an organization based in Portland, Oregon. Summer’s mission is to make the outdoors accessible for everybody – and every body. Her organization quickly grows in popularity, inspiring her to take it internationally.

First stop: Vancouver, British Columbia.

Crew

LAYLA CAMERON

Director, Executive Producer

IMG_9541

Layla Cameron is a queer fat activist, filmmaker and PhD student living in Vancouver, British Columbia. Fat Hiking Club is her first film. You can find out more about Layla and her work on her website.

DANIE EASTON

Director of Photography, Editor

img_9498.jpg

Danie Easton is a visual artist based in Vancouver, British Columbia. With a passion for storytelling, they produce cinematic works on a variety of subjects through their production company Eastowest Productions.

 

 

 

DISCUSSION

DIRECTOR’S STATEMENT

I moved to Vancouver from Toronto largely to indulge in the beauty of the Pacific Northwest and to try to climb some mountains. Shortly after arriving on the west coast, I read yet another article advocating that hiking is an excellent way to stay or become thin, and that all ‘good’ Canadians should take note. Considering myself already a halfway-decent Canadian, I quickly added this rhetoric to the steadily growing pile of flaming fatphobia that fuels my involvement in body politics, and began looking on social media for other fat hikers who shared my enthusiasm. After stumbling upon Fat Girls Hiking, I decided that this subject would make an excellent documentary film.

I hope that this film inspires you to find an activity that makes you feel good in your body – whatever that may be and whatever that may look like.

PRESS

THE VANCOUVER SUN – “METRO VANCOUVER’S LAYLA CAMERON HAPPY TO BE THE FACE OF FAT ACTIVISM”

THE LYNDA STEELE SHOW – “TALKING TO THE RECIPIENT OF THE 2018 NORA AND TED STERLING PRIZE FOR HER SHORT ‘FAT HIKING CLUB’ ABOUT HER MISSION AND THE FILM’S PURPOSE

THE STAR VANCOUVER – “FAT GIRLS HIKING BRINGS BODY-POSITIVE FITNESS TO VANCOUVER”

THE RATIONAL, VANCOUVER CO-OP RADIO – AUGUST 13, 2018

FOR THE RECORD – LAYLA CAMERON, PHD STUDENT AND FILMMAKER

THE RABBIT HOLE – FAT HIKING CLUB: A DISCUSSION ABOUT FAT ACTIVISM, POLITICS, AND LIBERATION FOR ALL